COM 208: YouTube

History

  • Three former PayPal employees – Chad Hurley, Steve Chen and Jawed Karim – created YouTube in February 2005
  • YouTube allows anyone to post movie and TV clips, music videos, and videoblogging and short original videos.

Popularity

  • “More video is uploaded to YouTube in 60 days than the 3 major US networks created in 60 years,” YouTube says
  • Google bought the company for $1.65 billion in Google stock in October 2006
  • YouTube is the third most visited website on the planet
  • YouTube competitors estimated that YouTube would see $70 million to $200 million in revenue in 2008
  • By March 2010, users were uploading 24 hours of video per minute
  • YouTube exceeded two billions views per day in May 2010. (See Timeline for more YouTube milestones)

Links to popular videos and channels

Partners

  • Hundreds of partners are making more than $100,000 per year, YouTube says
  • YouTube has signed more than 10,000 partners, including Disney, Turner and Univision
  • YouTube features more than 7,000 hours of full-length movies and shows

Popular channels

YouTube and politics

  • Political candidates have used YouTube to reach young voters
  • Barack Obama has taken questions via YouTube

YouTube and social issues

  • Users sometimes post videos showing police brutality, political violence and other acts. Examples: Fallujah Mosque Shooting. UCLA police brutality
  • Some videos give people a reputation that is difficult to shake. Example: “I personally believe…” Miss South Carolina, Caite Upton, gave a convoluted response in answer to a question in the Miss Teen USA contest in 2007. She later placed third in the Amazing Race (See her bio).

Does YouTube promote violence or deter it?

Bandwidth

  • YouTube was using more bandwidth in 2007 than the entire Internet in 2000.
  • YouTube was spending about $1 million per day to maintain adequate bandwidth

$1 billion lawsuit

  • In March 2007, Viacom announced that it was suing YouTube and Google for more than $1 billion. Viacom said YouTube had nearly 160,000 of its videos on its website without Viacom’s permission
  • Viacom’s brands include: MTV Networks, BET Networks, Paramount Pictures, Paramount Home Entertainment an DreamWorks.
  • Viacom said YouTube had done “little or nothing” to stop copyright infringement. Example: The documentary “An Inconvenient Truth” has been viewed on YouTube 1.5 billion times.

YouTube statement on lawsuit

  • In June 2010, a New York District Court granted our request for summary judgment and held that YouTube is protected by the safe harbor of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). This is an important victory not just for us, but also for the billions of people around the world who use the web to communicate and share experiences with each other.

YouTube position on copyright infringement

  • We take copyright very seriously. We’ve built groundbreaking technology for copyright holders that we call Content ID, a sophisticated set of tools that helps them find their content on YouTube and gives them the choice of what to do when they find it: block it, leave it up, or make money from it.
  • Content ID scans over 100 years of video every day and is used by over 1000 partners, including every major US network broadcaster, movie studio, and record label.
  • In addition, if a user feels that a video is violating their copyright, they can flag the video and select “infringes my copyright” from the list of options for review by the YouTube team. If a user feels they have wrongly received a DMCA copyright takedown they can file a counter-notice.
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4 thoughts on “COM 208: YouTube

  1. Pingback: COM 208: Midterm review | Writing • Photography • Blogs • Journalism

  2. Pingback: YouTube: World’s largest video-sharing community | Writing • Photography • Blogs • Journalism

  3. Pingback: COM 208: Midterm review | Writing • Photography • Blogs • Journalism

  4. Pingback: COM 208: Midterm exam | Writing • Photography • Blogs • Journalism

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